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exchanges, and perhaps get out of this ideowhrojical foreign policy so that we can move to sort of the latin left 3.0, the 1.0 was probably fidel in cuba which i think pretty much went out of, you know, it's been superseded. the second wave is probably hugo chavez. but i think the latin left needs to progress towards a third phase. so perhaps if you combine all of these measures the more innovative social measures and perhaps adherence to more environmental climate change concerns, then the bolivarrian revolution can continue and influence the wider region. >> charlie: many people think that there's little resemblance between chavez and bolivar. >> well, yeah, i think that chavez always made these historical illusions to simon bolivar. i think it was a little bit over the top sometimes. but simon bolivar resonates in venezuela. he united the country. throughout much of the 19th century venezuela was divided politically. you had these regional leaders and the 20th century was dominated by military dictators. venezuela harks back to them and that resonates quite a lot symbolically. that's why
of what i hear and see that reflects on american foreign policy. what do we do about that? >> yeah. okay. >> im away from my country, 65 years. i have just a little question. the first one -- >> make it one. >> i can't make it -- it's just a small one. the united states said 76 billion dollars, what's it up with? they gave them 36 billion last year. attacks our people in gaza. before president obama went to the middle east, sent the message to ben beep, ask him, tell me the dates which you are going to withdraw from the west bank, but he ignore that. when he went there, he said i want to make two states, when you and pal stippians, but he came back again -- >> do you have a question? >> yes, please. the united states, raise real to withdraw, but they ignore that also. how can we punish this state to take our things? thank you. >> uh-huh. >> third question, lady in the back. >> lady in the back, where is she? >> thank you. i'm an iranian-american journalist. >> uh-huh. >> you spoke about different players -- >> uh-huh. >> -- on this issue. what about the role of iran? do you see the role
, foreign policy tends to either stain or illuminate a president's legacy. time will tell which foreign policy position will define the obama years. joining us to discuss from washington is former assistant secretary of state and professor at george washington university, professor pj crowley. professor, thank you for joining us. >> hello. >> pj as we talk about the legacy of the obama doctrine, vis-a-vis our war on terrorists drones. the attacks were motivated to do what they did by the wars in iraq and afghanistan. i'll quote a little bit from that story. the 19-year-old suspect in the boston marathon bombings has told interrogators that the american wars in iraq and afghanistan, motivated he and his brother to carry out the attack. what do you make of that, pj? >> i'm not surprised at all that has been a motivator for jihadists around the world, particularly the u.s. invasion of iraq in 2003. so this just continues a theme, and it's not even unique to the united states. faisal shazad, the times square bomber, said he was motivated by the ongoing drone campaign in pakistan. >> wes, as
as normal and sweet. >>brian: is there a chance they were normal men and did our foreign policy play into this? a foreign c.i.a. operative, head of the osama bin laden unit, what went into the mind set of these two that you can ascertain from what you know? >> i think we're going to find because of the internet age, because of the rapidity of communications, the grievances of the arab world against the united states in terms of our foreign policy, whether it's being on the arab peninsula, supporting the saudi tyranny, supporting the israelis is now a common thread across the muslim world. as long as that foreign policy stays in place, we need to realize that we're cultivating enemies. this is going to continue both at home and abroad for a very long time. >>john: we should expect more of these kinds of attacks? >> without a doubt, sir. this is no reason to believe our domestic population of young male muslims is going to be immune from the propaganda of al qaeda and other groups that has worked everywhere in the world. this is just a problem that america needs to face. we don't neces
something against the american government. they had a heated argument about u.s. foreign policy. nice to see you, sir. >> hey, nice to see you. >> tell me, how did you first meet the two brothers? was it just living in the same building in is that how you knew them? >> i met the older brother two weeks prior into moving into the apartment under them. i met him at a pizza is shop across from my high school. >> what was tamerlan like? >> my first interaction with him was he was sitting at a table at a pizza shop across my high school and he was talking to another kid that used to go to cambridge latin high school. i overheard the conversation and he was basically explaining the koran to the person he was sitting with and the differences between the bible and the koran. i noticed in a way he was idolizing the koran and trash talking the bible. i was very interested in the topic and i didn't know much about religion, whether it's christianity or islam, and he seemed like he was very well-educated about both so i wanted to join the argument or the discussion. so, yeah, i basically joined the disc
, the debt which is self-explanatory, the problem is a lot worse than the lead manager in, surrender, foreign-policy chapter, it is not a neo conservative argument, more a reflection of how we believe our place in the world and what it is and the debt is inevitable for most of us and is about abortion for the most part. >> this book is being published in march. how long did you have to put the book together and were you thinking of obama's second term? what was the time line? >> i didn't think mitt romney would win but i put it together rather quickly. i have been thinking about it but the book is not a huge book because how much would you read about the four horsemen? is a slim book-of-the-month to write. >> the budget situation, what are your thoughts on that? >> i think there is an ideological divide washington that will be hard to come to any consensus or agreement on what to do. we are in bad shape in that sense. i like the paul ryan budget came out recently. i am a fan of a lot of ideas in that budget and republicans need more ideas and less latitude. i am happy in the direction that party is
have the former cia bin laden head. he warned us that our foreign policy interventions in the muslim world, all of these neocon-motivated interventions. i notice that c-span has not been talking about it. i have great respect for c-span, but they have not talked about the senate just passed a resolution that basically gives israel carved blocks to attack iran. blanche. host: there's concern about losing intelligence if the suspect is not interrogated as an enemy combatant. caller: that might be invalid, but if we don't address the foreign policy, we will have waves ofeople attacking our cities. look at what they were able to do in boston -- shut down a whole city. been on "russia today" talking about the neocon agenda for syria. from now to gabriel laurel, maryland, on our democrat line. caller: good morning. first-time caller. i think these guys should not be classified as an enemy combatant, because he is a u.s. citizen. ,f he was timothy mcveigh he was not considered an enemy combatant, because he was a u.s. citizen. there's no place in the thisnd not a u.s.-born citizen, they sho
overseas. in terms of our foreign policy. if we need to keep doing that and we have to keep doing it. we have to tell the american people how bloody and how long this war is going to be. this has nothing to do with gender equality or elections. it has to do with waging war against people believe to be interfering with their land and their faith. lou: thank you both for being with us. >> thank you, sir. lou: up next, the markets recover after yesterday's massive sell-off. we will show you why here next. ♪ @ ♪ lou: stocks recovered from the biggest 1-day sell-off of this year on encouraging news on housing. joining us now, a senior u.s. economist for deutsche bank securities. this is a pretty impressive performance today. is it convincing enough hat we are going to see more strength on the days ahead? >> it certainly has been impressive as a performance. i think a lot of the movement we saw today was just to recover from the massive sell-off yesterday when the news of the tragedy in boston struck. stocks went into a sharp nosedive. the news that it was a relatively limited event
's not rocket science. it's just common sense. >>> let's bring in mike, staff writer and celeste, foreign policy analyst from the department of labor's occupational safety and health administration. great to have you both here. when you heard about this, mike and started looking through the osha records, i saw it from your reporting, were you surprised it had been so long since osha inspected the plant? >> no. literally the plant had not been inspected in my lifetime, literally not since 1985. there's not enough osha inspector inspectors for the country. there are so few in texas, it would take 98 years for them to inspect every place once. it didn't surprise me. typically there's only an inspector when a worker calls up and complains and typically only in a union workplace. >> it's a complaint and people come out and not like doors on hazardous work sites. >> occasionally, not that often. >> what is the standard. you would think a fertiliz fertilizer -- about 20 employees in this west fertilizer warehouse where this happened. what is this standard that would prompt a heightened level of scrutin
.o.p. failed on foreign policy, a perception i agree with. there was also the fact that the republicans didn't do anything about the health care issue. didn't do anything to promote a genuine free market in health care which i talk about in the book. as a result it made it inevitable that when it came time to dream health care issue, it would be dealt with on democratic terms. republicans; however, however rarely they launched full front tam i salt on the size and scope of the federal government have tried indirect routeds to limiting the federal government. during the reagan years we had the supply side revolution the idea would be we cut marginal tax rates which were onerous. fourteen tax brackets. it was definitelily the time for some cutting and the hope was that the economic growth that tax cuts and deregulation would unleash would allow a covert assault on federal spending. the reagan administration with the help of a bipartisan conservative majority in the house and senate had a great deal of success in cutting nondefense domestic discretionary spending. they did relatively little; ho
was the first president to make humans rights a cornerstone of u.s. foreign policy. tell me about your conversation with president carter. >> one of the things that interested me, he was--what he said about impunity, where he said that he varied a bit from more pure rights activists. he said he wasn't necessarily opposed to giving wretched dictators impunity if it meant that they would step down sooner. they were afraid of being prosecuted by the international criminal court, and because of that they're not willing to give up. they stay and they fight. but if you gave them impunity, and you were not going to prosecute them, they might be willing to step down sooner and save more people sooner. >> michael: it's a cut your loses type of a policy. >> yes more practical. >> michael: it seems that way. let's move to representative john lewis. he's a really spiritual man. how were you able to capture this through your photography? >> i think he simply gave it to me. we had a wonderful conversation first. i interviewed him for the text that accompanies each photograph then we went outside his
plitations for civil liberties questions, potentially foreign policy questions. i want to listen for a second to president bush after 9/11 just as a reminder where we were as we talked about what happened in that moment. let's take a listen. >> on september 11th, enemies of freedom committed an act of war against our country. our war on terror begins without data. but it does not end there. it will not end until every terrorist group of global reach has been found, stopped and defeated. [ applause ] >> so this set out the parameters,ary that we have been working under for the past decade or more. >> yeah. that was the global war on terror. there was a big gap between that rhetoric we just heard and the legal authority that the president actually had, which under the 2001 authorization of force was to only pursue al qaeda, the taliban and groups directly found responsible for 9/11. we'll continue to have that legal friction both on civil liberties and foreign policy questions. the first instinct to combat is that people are rightfully outraged at these killers. part of what they want to do is
not only a lost opportunity domestically. the foreign policy of this also. the most interesting thing that reagan did early on in foreign policy was the air traffic controller strike and toughness at times at home have repercussions aboeroad. this story got lost because of the boston bombings. >> but helps new awax. you only have to send that message once or twice to have one person go back and go, he is crazy. you know what he just told me? he said he was going to destroy me. >> what the president, what president obama, for reasons not only to him and his nature, clearly does not do or cannot do is something that lyndon johnson did do and this story has been repeated too many times for it not to be apockrifal. frank church a senator from idaho opposed senator johnson on an element of vietnam policy and another senator, i forget which one, wanted a line in an appropriations bill for a dam in his state. and he was on the fence with regard to lyndon johnson's view on vietnam policy. he called the president specifically asking, i need this. kou help me get it? and the president of the un
's investment in foreign-policy is national security insurance. there is nothing foreign about foreign policy anymore. smartcan make the small,. w vestments upfront and avoid more costly conflicts and greater burdens down the road. , we'vepast few months seen developments underscore the state -- stakes for having a strong and -- strong american presence in the world. that was a positive step toward stability in the volatile region of the world where we need partnerships. the committee is more than immersed in suyyruiaia. we have treated millions to humanitarian relief -- we have provided millions to humanitarian relief. i expect we will talk about syria somewhat today. having returned from beijing and north koreathe issue took center stage, we are reminded once again that america is the guardian of global security. we should be proud of that. one not turn our back on keys nor will we hesitate what we need to do to defend our allies. if budget is an analyst patient of our values and priorities -- this budget is an illustration of our values and priorities. i have a record of wanting to do defi
of charges that becomes a big foreign policy problem. that's one of the reasons why the state department was so opposed to the waterboarding under colin powell. >> exactly. to have it labeled -- so then you get into the territory of were crimes committed? and what kind of future implications there are for that. >> briefly, before i let you go. we do want to talk about it in more detail, the book. the appreciate now to move the program from the cia back to where many say it afc belonged in the military where there could be more oversight. what you've uncovered is the extent of secret relationships with pakistan, things that have never been reported, never been revealed, i guess, to other than the intel gens community? >> i think when you look at the history of the secret war since 9/11, there's so much that's gone on in the shadows that we have not known about and not certainly told to the public or told to congress. as you said, pressure is building to become more transparent. president obama set in the state of the union there would be more transparency, and we'll see what happens. >> t
been postponed. they let us know that that is being postponed and there is a foreign policy component and kerry has been involved in the briefings as a native bostonian. he was emotionally affected in the last couple of days. we noticed that. >> and roger, as we are going through these initial reports and what they are getting in,they are getting everything foreign and domestic and going through old intercepts right now. did they miss something or something that they thought was nothing to it. >> they are going through cell phone records. >> completely. as andrea said, washington has no immediate role. this is all tactical and local, but it's about pulling all the strings on information and see what exactly is the picture that now can be participated. when i was at the white house, it was getting information and bringing it into the west wing and make sure the president had a list of understanding at that moment and reminding everyone that first reports are often wrong and we'll wait for corroboration and confirmation. you expect the president to be careful what he says publicly and m
the implications here in terms of foreign policy and possibly national security and how the white house responds in the coming days. first before we do that, i want to play some sound from dzhokah tsarnaev's uncle who came and spoke to the press earlier this morning, talking about check nia, the checken identity in the united states, let's play a little of that sound. >> hatred to those who were able to settle themselves. these are the only reasons i can imagine of. anything else, anything else to do with religion, with islam, that's a fraud. it's a fake. >> "the new york times" white house correspondent, peter baker is with us. peter, thanks for joining us, you were the moscow bureau chief for four years and covered the second chechen war. a lot of folks in america are hearing the word chechnya for the first time and don't understand the dynamics between chechnya, russia and the united states. can you give us a little primer about the sort of tumult in the region? >> it's a good question. we're learning a lot today, a lot of americans haven't focused on what has been chilling situation for many
. there are people on the other side of the world that don't like our foreign policy, in the middle east who don't like our culture in any way. to them we're the enemy. doesn't it stun you, mr. mayor, people from a breakaway or rebellious former soviet union have come and killed anonymously people they don't even know but know them as fellow inhabitants of america, just as a slaughter? and we don't have a front with chechnya. we don't have a beef with them. or them with us. that just, to me, is like -- i almost feel like i don't know anything to say at this point sometimes. >> it was a total shocker to me. i went through about ten different scenarios yesterday who it could be, from, you know, islamic radicals to right-wing crazies, to just isolated people who were just nuts. i never would have thought of chechnya. the fact is, if anything, we're seen as somewhat sympathetic with the chechnyans and overcritical of the russians. maybe we're right or wrong. that's the way it's seen. i was in russia a day after the attacks in beslan, you know, that really were a tremendous shock to the russian peopl
on there that was of a foreign policy priority of the united states. particularly in the world of counterterrorism. if in fact, ties can be confirmed, this changed things significantly. >> what kind of precedent is there in your mind for this kind of attack where we're seeing tactics of somewhat conventional terrorist hit, followed up by what is essentially criminals fleeing and car jacking and tangling with police? is that a format that we've seen in other terrorist incidents? >> in the aftermath of the attacks on monday, we knew they were not suicide attacks. many people assume that the perpetrators were going to flee to try and hide out. there's a lot of references to the eric rudolph model during the centennial park bombing in 1996. it turned out what we had was a third situation. where these individuals constructed additional explosive devices, were planning to conduct additional attacks and because of i think the fbi press conference where they publicized their photos it triggered them into doing something entirely different. probably different from what their plan was on the aftermath of the attack on
u.s. foreign policy. and as that rises, hostility rises, rage rises and people want to reach out against the united states. so this radicalization is an issue that the u.s. government has been focused on for many, many years certainly since before 9/11 but certainly since 9/11. >> i read an interesting article, i think it was in the national review, but i have to go back and check that about the fact that we know longer sort of patriotize those who come, legal immigrants who come here. and looks at europe and says part of what happened in britain was that there were just these separate communities, no sense of common community. and it seems to me that these -- at least the older brother represented that sense of alienation. >> possibly. one of the things that we found is people that have a strong core and very strong values regarding anything can't be brainwashed into going against their values. >> right. >> he was looking for something. and let's say that he was radicalized in chechnya, in russia. he was already of the mindset to -- well, he would have been a sitting duck had he
school massacre. over 300 killed, mostly children. the moscow metro bombing, 39 people killed. foreign policy has an interesting anal a sysianalysis. chernen writes the numerous terror strikes have not been included in the short list of major terrorist attacks, america's 9/11, london's 7-7, and spain. instead, russia was placed in a different category where like in israel, terrorism was deemed a response to the government's repression, rather than an attack against humanity as such. that's obviously one person's take. in the broader conversation about global terror, those attacks are not often included in the same list. >> although if you are living in moscow or living in russia, you would certainly say they were terrorism. the russians did at the time say they were attacks of terrorism. a conversation we're having now is a reminder of why we do need to know what's happening around the world. why it matters what's happening in chechnya, the capital was flattened during the war there. that chows of chechens have been killed and at some point we have to wake up to the fact that the world
a lot to make america safer, but we are not yet safe. and clearly, because of our foreign policy, because of the freedoms we enjoy, there are individuals here in this country and certainly around the world who do not like america. they want to bring harm to america. and it's for that reason that we do have all of the laws we have put in place following 9/11 to ensure that we make america safe as possible, consistent with the protections provided under the constitution. >> okay. but do you think new york police commissioner chief ray kelly, who is probably one of the greatest in the history of the city, all right, really. they, of course, have a whole anti-terrorism, counterterrorism unit. they also, general gonzalez, they also monitor the muslim community. that is not to say that all muslims are radical jihadists, but they do monitor the muslim community. they take a lot of flack for it from liberals and left and certain media people. but that's what they do. when you look at this story, sir, in a sense, i hate to say this, but it's all the same. all these things. young, radical
rights foreign policy. it is not a foreign policy priorities and because it is the right thing to do. it is tied to our own security. it is tied to the possibility of prosperity and nation's living by rule of law. countries were strong human- rights prevail are countries where people do better. economy strive, rules of law are better. there are countries that lead on the world's station project stability across the regions. strong respect for human rights is not merely an indicator that the country is likely doing unleashes a country's potential. it helps to advance growth and progress. of a countrythink like burma for a minute. because of its steps towards democratic reform, a country that has been isolated for years is now making progress. has it reached for rwanda to be? no. but it is on the road. it is moving. more people are contributing to the economy and participating in the government, leading to faster growth and development. by starting to embrace universal rights the government is opening the doors to a stronger partnership with their neighborhood -- with their neighborhoo
foreign policy discussions. we're not a country that's in the mood to go invade anyone anymore. the tsarnaev brothers have been in the united states much longer. they were really immigrants and the fact that they come from chechnya, a place that's been at war with russia has in some ways softened the response. so far at least, i think we have not seen as much anti-muslim kind of talk as there was after 9/11. >> i think you're absolutely right. there's been some. there's been some of that almost knee jerk reaction, which obviously is a problem, but nothing like what occurred immediately after 9/11. isn't that right? >> yeah. i also think -- there are a billion muslims in the world. muslims come in every shape and color. in the american imagination, we have almost racialized what it means to be muslim. the fact these guys are from chechn chechnya under mines the level of racist reactions. to some degree part of what the anti-muslim sentiment after 9/11 was not only based on religion, but it was based on the idea of race and ethnicity. >> thanks very much for coming in. >> thank y
foreign policy. and there's no disagreement about that in my country, that parliament passed last year unsl a policy, a resolution which def the icelandic objectives in the arctic. so together with the other countries, we hope to play a constructive part, and evidence of this was that a few months ago, one of our april civil servants and officials was chosen as the first director general of the secretary of the rctic council. >> the icelandic is coming out of financial turmoil. what would you consider the future of the krona, and are you at all considering any alternative currency for iceland? >> i think it's a positive indication of how we have moved out of the financial crisis, but i can come here to the national press club, and only when six minutes are left, i get that question orkt financial issue. nobody would have believed that four or five years ago. but that is the state of co together again and talk about how we recovered from the financial crisis and how we dealt with the crisis in a different way from many oer countries, how we did not follow the established orthodoxies of
pillar of our 21st century foreign policy. there's no disagreement about that in my country. the parliament passed last year anonymously a policy resolution which defined the icelandic objective in the arctic. so together with the other nordic countries we hope to play a constructive part and evidence of this was that few months ago one of our april servant was the first director general of the secretary of the arctic. >> several currency questions. the icelandic money is coming out of financial turmoil. what would you consider the future of the money? and are you considering any alternative currency for iceland ? >> i think it's a positive indication of how we have all dealt with the financial crisis. i can comment on the national press club only six minutes are left and i get that question. [laughter] of the financial issues. nobody would believe that for a five years ago. without in state of affairs we could perhaps come together again and talk about how we're the financial crisis and how we dealt with a crisis in a different way from many other countries. how we did not
unwavering in her support of president reagan. just the foreign- policy support. famously, they both worked to sort of speak half-truths about the unsustainability of the soviet union, something that coincided with the placing of the soviet union under its own contradiction. some will tell you it was almost like moses parting the red sea. i don't think it was quite that. but clearly, the truth telling was not irrelevant. hope tonor ms. dissidents working behind the eastern bloc. domestically, they had a -- theyusly important were trying something very radical. they wanted a break with the economic policies of the past. the fact that they were not isolated, they could point to someone on the other side of the ocean in charge of this was important. that made quite a difference. you can see in the tributes paid to lady thatcher, people who work closely to president reagan saying it made a difference. he is not on his own. there is an impressive leader in europe who shares his ideas. host: was it vice versa for her in britain? guest: it was. famously, they got along well. but there were differe
and we could concentrate solely on traditional foreign policy threats like iran and syria and the instability of the korean peninsula. of course those threats remain large but this shows we are still a country in terrorist cross hairs both from abroad and from within. >> it sounds like you think this will reshape our focus as well. >> i think it will, no question about that. but at the same time we've got to make sure that we don't single out one particular community for attack and os t tracism. >> it's very common for them to sfwring we don't care at all to we exaggerate the threat. this is a common pendulum swing. it's also a mistake. and what we've also seen, just in the last week, is most of the coverage and most of the discussion by elites on both side of the aisle has been far more measured than what you just read by representative king. >> but it was measured because we were still a country in crisis. now that it seems that the crisis, perhaps, has subsided, now the nuts will come out. >> that's true, and this is where the media plays an even bigger role. in the mon
encounter with tamerlan in a pizza shop three months ago. the older brother argued with foreign policy, the wars in afghanistan and iraq and religion. tamerlan referred to the bible as a cheap copy of the koran and maybe of his countries are wars are based upon the bible. he had nothing against the american people. he had something against the american government. yeah. and dzhokhar became naturalized last september. federal officials told the ap his older brother had a green card but may have been thwarted by an assault charge. >> some ex-girlfriend. >> stephanie: right. you know, we'll find out more from the fbi because apparently russia had asked them to investigate him at one point but they came up with nothing and at that particular point. the mayor of boston. >> thank you, thank you, thank you. thank you to the law enforcement officials for working together. state police, boston police, fbi, all working together. that's when government works the best. i want to thank also the citizens out there. the last week, i know what's happening because of the bombing at the marathon. but to
would you pursue to the domestic and foreign policy? >> i want to thank you for hosting this debate. it is a great honor to be here an i want thank my colleague for being here as well. i want of offer my condolences to all the families of all the victims and offer my thanks to the first responders, the doctors, the nurse, our citizens who, i think behaved so valley lently and in such a compassionate way. it's been a long week. my thoughts and prayers are with those who are recovering. i will continue to do what what i've have been doing on homeland security issues. one of the differences between myself and mr. markey is our voting record on homeland security. i think one of the great parts of what happened this week in terms of the rescue and the coordination and the capture of these terrorists was the coordination between the different agency, the joint terrorism task force. task to create the force. mr. markey vote against that proposal. i voted for funding for homeland security. mr. markey voted against that. i will continue my priorities that i have. it is probably why the fir
strategic allies like israel and brazil and poland reward for their cooperation with u.s. foreign policy by included in the face or -- visa waiver program? >> yeah, but i'm not in favor of living standards do. i think about to meet the standards and procedures under. spit out another standard has been what you describe, which is a 3% rejection rate as determined by the customs and immigration service. some countries go slightly beyond the cart -- some embassies have a more liberal policy with regard to applications than others do. with that in mind, instead of outsourcing decision-making to the customs and integration service, would you like to see input with regard to diplomatic and security and also economic considerations when these determinations are made? >> i would have to review the. let me just tell you that there are several established criteria in the act with respect to the current standards of the visa waiver. one is that the government provides reciprocal visa waivers. too, that the government issues secured machine readable passports. three, that the government certifies th
, what specific changes would you pursue in our domestic and foreign policies o make us safer? >> first, i want to thank you for hosting this debate. i also want to thank my colleague, ed markey, for being here as well. before we begin, i just want to offer my condolences to all the families of all the victims and offer my thanks to the first responders, to the docs, nurses, to our citizens who i think behaved so valiantly in such a compassionate way during this past week. it's been a long week. again, my thoughts and prayers are with all those who are recovering. in terms of what i would do, i would continue to do what i have been doing on homeland security issues. i think one of the stark differences between myself and mr. markey is our voting record on homeland security. i think one of the great parts of what happened this week in terms of the rescue and the coordination and the capture of these terrorists was the coordination between the different agencies, the joint terrorism task force. i voted to create the joint terrorism task force. mr. markey voted against that proposal. repea
overall policy of how is the foreign affairs budget, the state department budget would be prioritize in the entire region as opposed to just focusing on one country since they seem to be working together ever before? >> well, thank you very much, congressman meeks. i am very, very hopeful. i am planning a trip shortly to both colombia and brazil and other countries hopefully as time permits. we've had some issues, obviously, with argentina over some debt issues, repayment, so forth, which we need to work through. but, look, western hemisphere is our back yard. it's critical to us. too often countries in the western hemisphere think that the united states doesn't pay enough attention to them and on occasion it's probably been true. i think we need to reach out vigorously. we plan to. the president will be traveling to mexico very shortly. other -- i can't many countries. he will be going. i will be going, other high-level visits. we'll try to do everything possible to try to change the attitude of a number of nations where we've had obviously sort of a breach in the relationship ove
. and really at the heart of it is the fact that one of obama's enduring legacies when it comes to foreign policy, he has solidified assassination as an essential component of policy. >> they can do it in the shadows, as you pointed out. in the book, i would say there hasn't been a lot of public resistance aside from people like you and others in the press. how have they done this without facing much resistance? publicly or inside the government from people who should be stepping up and saying, wait a minute, we can't kill u.s. citizens without due process? >> right, i think there's no question that if john mccain had won the election in 2008 or mitt romney had won it in 2012 that liberals would be screaming about this stuff and saying, you know, that -- there would be this thing, war crimes, we should do impeachment and the reality is that i think a lot of people -- and i think this is sincere. a lot of people so fed up with the iraq war, perceived as the sort of crimes of the bush administration they wanted it to end and the obama administration has sold people a bill of goods. the idea
families have skin in the game of foreign policy, but if you don't a son or daughter in uniform, husband or wife in uniform, where is your skin in that game when you're not paying for those decisions? and when we make decisions that we don't have to pay for, we make bad decisions. i agree with the president. folks need to pay their fair share. i think we all need to have some skin in the game. folks who make more ought to pay more. folks who make less ought to pay less. but we are all members of the board of directors of the united states of america, mr. speaker. all 320 million of us sit on the board of directors of the united states of america, and yet you ought to have skin in the game when you are making decisions about high this organization runs. how do we create revenue? how do we reduce deficits? how do we make sure folks are paying their fair share? the good news is, mr. speaker, the president's aware of the fair tax. i am not willing to call him a fair tax president. i don't think the president's quite onboard, we are not going to wait on the president to be onboard. we are goi
because of president obama's foreign policy with regard to terrorism. that would also be outrageous. >> there are two sides to this fence. don't politicize an event like this. don't do it. that's opinion, okay. >>steve: stuart varney is going to have a lot to talk about over at fox business today, 9:20 eastern time where he takes control of that channel each and every week. all right, stewart. >>gretchen: coming up, boston has a message for the attacker. we'll show you how citizens are speaking out now. >>brian: a dad passes out behind the wheel, and his young kids spring into action. >> we're going 90. >>brian: the outcome? >>brian: the outcome? nothing short of a miracle. with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better mpg. say hi to the 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. bjorn earns unlimited rewas for his small business take theseags to room 12 please. [ garth ] bjors small busiss earns double miles on every purchase every day. produce delivery. [ bjorn ] just put it on my spark card. [ garth why settle for less? ahh, oh!
partner for me in foreign policy but a good friend. >> do you miss her around here? >> i do. she's earned her rest and i know that whatever she does, she's going to be able to continue to be a leader and incredibly positive force for the causes i care about and that she cares about, all around the world. >> the president not able to endorse the vice president. >> who is walking down the hall as you talk to him. >>> let's go to a florida neighborhood that has seen a remarkable turnaround thanks in part to the efforts of one generous man. here's nbc's gabe gutierrez. >> reporter: in the theme park capital of the world, hospitality means big business. >> thank you so much. appreciate it. >> reporter: but to harris rosen, it means much more. >> thank you. >> hospitality really is appreciating a fellow human being. >> reporter: he grew up in the slums of new york, a family of immigrants. now he runs seven hotels in orlando, his self-made success would be remarkable on its own but that's not what he's most proud of. >> came to the realization that i really had to now say thank you. >> reporter:
see canada from my porch. >> a foreign policy expert? this is an opportunity to allow these people to come to the united states and work here and raising that visa is an important part of why this is a pro-growth policy. que from president reaganth a farewell address wherebee ing cn the hill and said that if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors, the doors were open to anyone with the will and hard to get here. this is a good reminder that we have to keep working on this bill and i would wonder if you wanted to comment as to why that was meaningful to you in this context. >> the jack kemp republican position has always been immigrant welcoming. you see this coming stronger both from the business community and from the religious community, communities of faith. i was in a meeting with the head of the republican party in 2000. 10 major trade associations, i was there as the taxpayer guy. they went around the table about what is important. they said do something bad to trial lawyers, capitains between thos project and that the and the chair said thank you very much and got u
component of his foreign policy, and obviously, this just emphasizes that. >> [inaudible question] >> the mexicoan government has expressed its interest in that agenda. in that regard, bringing president obama to mexico, what programs can we expect along the road and secretary kerry, -- >> [inaudible] >> some countries in latin american countries were on the back burner for several years. is it your express intent to reach out to the region? >> we have agreed to enlarge our agenda, and we are going to be talking about initiatives that have to do with high level engagement into our economic dialogue. we will be talking and find a mechanism to talk in terms of the vocation, research and innovation. so those issues and structures around them will be on the agenda, and the talks, initially discussed by president obama and president nieto. >> the answer is profoundly, yes, we do intend, i intend to, personally. and, in fact, i had intended to try to travel to the region next week, but because of the events this week, and because of some other things happening, i've had to postpone that
right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very beginning of the iraq war, when susan sarandon and tim robbins spoke out against the war, they had their invitation to talk to the baseball hall of fame withdrawn. and right after that i had a crew from fox news come to my house to interview me, because i don't go to the studios anymore. they want me? they
think about in modern history any time there's been an attack by an immigrant or foreign born national in this country, it directly affected immigration policy. in 1993, the bombing led to the 1996 immigration overhaul which kicked a lot of immigrants off welfare and tightened up a lot of things there. after 9/11 there was a lot of different culture about immigration changing entirely. we had books defendi ining internme internment. even tknow there's no connectio, it will affect things. >> let's play sound from senator dick durbin. a member of the gang of eight. >> the worst thing we can do is nothing. if we do nothing leaving 11 million people in the shadows not making borders safer, not having information that comes from employment and these visa holders, we will be less safe in america. immigration reform will make us safer. >> victoria, what's your take on this? what's this going to mean for immigration reform? >> it absolutely will make us safer. we'll see millions more dollars going into border enforcement. one of the key provisions is we'll have an effective visa entry and exit
think for the foreign exchange market, it's more a question of policy action. and now, because we're in this limbo, that leaves sterling a little bit of limbo. >> meanwhile, the treasury there is targeting sales of 4 to 5 billion sales in six-month and is 1-month t bills. yes, same with italian yields, as well, michael. are we now at the low point in the cycle for spanish and italian yields? who is going to drive them lower from here and why would you? >> i think the market has seen a lot of liquidity expansion. first from the fed and then lastly from the bank of japan. and combined with the renewed commitment from the ecb to protect the euro, this has depressed yields to these kind of levels. i think it's difficult to see us going dramatically further. and if anything, strategically, we think that the three major problems in europe, the recession, inconsistent crisis management and rising political and social backlash against austerity are likely to come through and that leaves spain and italy very vulnerable to a sharp increase in yields. we're looking, for example, for 10-year
in our country and our international security policies must be changed to reflect that, to train foreign terrorists who hate america, are at war with innocent americans and its institutions and that's why i say it's really time for a tougher and stronger new policies in order to protect america in its people. yes, immigration will be a part of our great country, and it also has to be controlled. >> do you think it ultimately has to change the fabric and culture of boston? >> there are some people that want to keep it the way it is. i want to make sure that public safetiet and security of innocent people is protected. that to me is the most fundamental issue and, yes, we'll protect our sacred liberties and freedoms, let's make sure we also protect innocent people from terrorist activities. >> ray flinn served as mayor of boston from 1994 to 1993 and thank you for joining us. >> we'll slip in a quick break. the latest situation on what's happening in boston and watertown. residents under lockdown. there's a shot of them earlier, but something is happening in watertown. we'll let you know i
who the individual is, if they are a foreign national -- >> or a group of individuals. >> -- or a group of individuals, it's the way which that person then initially directly connects to our policy. >> do you think that's right with respect to law enforcement, do you think the division between the timothy mcveigh's of the world and muhammads of the world? >> i think that it doesn't really. i mean, i believe -- this is from my experience, you cannot and should not get tunnel vision looking for a specific, you know, because somebody has a particular faith, they pray five times a day, therefore, it's an international terrorism versus a timothy mcveigh type. we have seen so many cases where you have -- >> let me just say, it could be a left wing terrorist, we literally know nothing. someone who is mad at his or her ex-spouse who happened to be working the medic tent. >> what you need to focus on is the activity, the race, religion, you know, all of that really is irrelevant when it comes to you have to be able to prove the activity isn't furtherance of terror. >> this is w
by foreign governments. the cia recognized this in an internal review and acknowledged many of the interrogation techniques were inconsistent with the public policy positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when they criticize another nation for engaging in torture and the unjustified same conduct under national security arguments. there are those that defend the techniques of waterboarding, stress positions and sleep deprivation because there was the office of legal counsel which issued a decision of proving of their use because they defined them as not being tortured. those opinions have since been repudiated by legal experts and even if its opinion it relies on a very legal definition of torture but also on factual representations about how the techniques of would be implemented that later proved inaccurate. this is an important context as to how the opinion came about but also as to how policy makers rely upon it. based upon a faeroe view of the available public record we determined that an appl
things that thatcher government did was scrap foreign exchange controls when it came to power in the late 1970s. so absolutely. privatization, eventual greater competition within the previously owned government sectors was a big plus. and obviously one contentious p policy was power between employers and trade unions. arguably now the u.k. has a much better industrial relations record than it did before 1979. >> you have to remember though in the '70s, you and i were doing our homework by candlelight when we had a three-day week. it did need rebalancing from that point of view. takes those lessons from those micropolicies which were successful whether there's some lessons today that need to be drawn by this current government because they are trying to kick-start wider only ownership but thatcher gave people the right to own their own homes but they had to qualify for mortgage on affordable income. >> that's one thing which the thatcher government did particularly in the early to mid 1980s. the big liberalization financial markets. scrapping of competition and credit control happened a lo
by foreign governments. the cia recognized this in an internal review and acknowledged that many of the interrogation techniques that employed were inconsistent with the public policy positions that the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticized another nation for engaging in torture, then justifies the same conduct under national security arguments. there are those that defend the techniques of, like waterboarding, stress and sleep deprivation because there was the office of legal counsel, which issued a decision of proving of their use because they defined them as not being torture. those opinions have since been repudiated by legal experts and the olc itself. and even in it his opinion it relies not only on a very narrow legal definition of torture but also on factual representation about how the techniques would be implemented that later proved inaccurate. this is in important context as to how the penny came about but also how policymakers relied upon it. based upon a thorough review of the avai
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